Paradiso Canto 10: Of Faith and Reason in an ICU

Down in adoration falling,
This great sacrament we hail;
Over ancient forms of worship
Newer rites of grace prevail;
Faith tells us that Christ is present
When our human senses fail.

– St. Thomas Aquinas
(Sing, My Tongue, The Savior’s Glory)

As I sit here writing this blog, in my ninety-eight year old father-in-law’s room, in a brand new ICU in New Jersey, it seems appropriate that my topic for consideration today is the Tenth Canto of Dante’s “Paradiso.”

In two more days, the family will face major decisions concerning my Father’s (my father-in-law’s) future.

His small, but strong, body lies dwarfed in a large hospital bed, hooked up to “who-knows-how-many” life-support systems; marvels of modern science.

Marvels, but not miracles.

The penultimate scene from the French film masterpiece “Of Gods and Men,” confronts me, as the waltz from “Swan Lake” sweeps over the me.

Some eight harried Cistercian monks in Algeria partake of their “Last Supper” and prepare for what is to come … Faith and Reason. Reason and Faith. What to do? How to accept? Why? Because.

An event of some twenty months ago also comes into focus.
Pope Benedict XVI is commenting upon the importance of both Faith and Reason, and on Thomas Aquinas in particular:
“When natural law and the responsibility … are denied, the way is thrown … open to ethical relativism at an individual level, and to totalitarianism at a political level.” A frightening thought, indeed. … “The great contribution of the ‘Angelic Doctor,’ was to underline the essential interaction between faith and reason; between theology and philosophy. … The trust St. Thomas places in these two instruments of knowledge can be explained by his conviction that both come from a single wellspring of truth, the divine Logos, which works in the area of both creation and redemption.” (Pope Benedict XVI on the Contribution of Thomas Aquinas to the world – NY Times, June 16, 2010)

I believe Dante would have concurred.

The medieval theologian Aquinas had, perhaps, the most influence on Dante’s Weltanschauung (worldview). Aquinas put the teachings of rational philosophy in the service of religious faith and doctrine. He called the natural law “the human participation in God’s eternal law.” He wrote about faith and reason, the “two wings on which the human spirit rises to the contemplation of truth. “ Through faith we accept Divine Revelation, and through reason we can understand basic practical principles (the ‘primary principles of natural law.’) ”

When Dante and Beatrice first arrive in the sphere of the Sun, a circle of spirits surrounds them in a dance of circling song and light. Aquinas is the spokesman for this first circle, the circle of the “twelve wise spirits.” Among these spirits we encounter many of the history’s great minds: Thomas’ teacher, Albertus Magnus of Cologne, King Solomon, (author of “Song of Songs”), Boethius (“Consolation of Philosophy”), Peter Lombard (“Sentences”), Gratian, Dionysius the Areopagite, Paulus Orosius; Isidore of Seville (“Etymologies”), the Venerable Bede, Richard of St. Victor, and a twelfth-century mystic opposed to Aquinas, called Siger of Brabant.

And, so at last, I come to the question frequently raised by many.

“Can science and religion be successfully remarried? Can a reunion of these old lovers infuse new vitality to the whole of western culture?” as Teilhard passionately asserted it would, or, as his critics suggest, does “Teilhard accomplish the reconciliation of science and religion at the expense of both partners to the marriage?” Does he fatally compromise both sides in forcing an alliance which should never have been attempted in the first place? See Pierre Teilhard De Chardin

Where does science (reason) begin and end? Where, and how, does it interact with, and lead to, and from, Faith? Can they be harmonized?

For Dante, all is harmonized in Heaven.

What say you? ????????

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About bobsinner

I am a retired educator: Administrator [Academic Dean; Director of Admissions] and History Teacher [Grades 9-Graduate School]. Recently of The Montclair Kimberley Academy, NJ. Presently a ruling elder of The Lawrenceville Presbyterian Church, NJ . View all posts by bobsinner

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